22 February 2006

We never trusted White

Belfast Telegraph

Killer Stone says: He was always pumping me for information

By Jonathan McCambridge and Deborah McAleese
22 February 2006

John White's former UDA associates last night backed the Belfast Telegraph's revelation that the sectarian killer was a Special Branch informer.

Milltown murderer Michael Stone said that White tried to "pump" him for information about other loyalists while they were prisoners at the Maze while UDA sources said his love of the flash lifestyle led to his recruitment by security forces.

Yesterday the Belfast Telegraph reported that senior intelligence sources had revealed that White, a former associate of Johnny Adair, had become a police informer after he was released from prison.

He had been serving a life sentence for the 1973 murders of nationalist politician Paddy Wilson and Irene Andrews, both of whom suffered multiple stab wounds.

Michael Stone, convicted of six murders, said: "I was always told not to say anything in front of him. He was always pumping me for information about all sorts of things."

A senior UDA source said: "He was driven by money and there was always speculation over his wealth. The ranks were warned not to talk in front of him."


Stone not surprised at Telegraph revelation

By Jonathan McCambridge

Milltown murderer Michael Stone has revealed how John White - exposed in the Belfast Telegraph as a tout - tried to gather intelligence on fellow loyalists while they were prisoners in the Maze.

Stone, convicted of six murders, said that sectarian killer White tried to "pump him" for information and claimed the UDA leadership suspected he was being "controlled" by the security forces.

Yesterday this paper reported that senior intelligence sources had revealed that White, once a close associate of Johnny Adair, had worked for Special Branch as an informer.

White was jailed for life for the 1973 murders of nationalist politician Paddy Wilson and Irene Andrews, both of whom suffered multiple stab wounds. It is believed he became an informer after his release from prison.

But Stone said he believed that White may have already been a grass during his time in the Maze.

He said he was "not surprised at all" by the Belfast Telegraph revelations.

"White was always really dodgy and for years had a terrible relationship with the leadership of the UDA. He had no credibility at all with them.

"We all knew what he was inside for and we all thought he was sick because he had mutilated a body.

"I was always told not to say anything in front of 'Coco', which was the name he was known as. He was not trusted."

Stone added: "He was always pumping me for information about all sorts of things.

"He asked me what I knew about Brian Nelson, he asked me what I knew about the Mid-Ulster UVF and Ulster Resistance. He was the only person inside who would talk openly about these things and I always told him it was information he did not need to know.

"We all thought he was being controlled because he was always trying to push the UDA in directions it did not want to go.

"Later on he turned into this big money man. He had a big house and an affluent lifestyle with the fancy clothes and car but he had no visible means of support.

"The security forces knew how much he liked the money and the flash lifestyle and that was how they were able to turn him. The last I heard he was pleading poverty in different parts of England.

"Geographically he is safe because he is out of the way, but I would not think he will be in any rush to come back to Northern Ireland because he has so many enemies."

White has been living in exile since February 2003 when he was forced out of Northern Ireland during a feud inside the UDA in which White had sided with Johnny Adair's so-called 'C' Company.

He was nicknamed 'Coco' because of his alleged involvement in drug dealing.


Special Branch saw 'easy target'

By Deborah McAleese

John White's drug dealing and greed made him an easy target for Special Branch recruitment, senior UDA sources said last night.

However, it was not until he was forced from the province with Johnny Adair following a feud inside the UDA in 2003, that they became convinced of his involvement.

One senior UDA source said: "He was driven by money and there was always speculation over his wealth. A lot of eyebrows were raised at his lifestyle and the ranks were warned not to talk in front of him. As far as we know he was recruited about two years after he got out of jail. He was turned by security forces who knew about his drug dealing and started playing a dangerous game," said a senior UDA source.

Former detective Johnston Brown, who put Adair in jail, last night said recruiting someone so close to Adair would have been a "feather in the bonnet" for Special Branch.

Stressing that he was not the senior intelligence source who leaked the information to the Belfast Telegraph, Mr Brown told the BBC White may have helped prevent further violence in the summer of 2000 when Adair was released under the Good Friday Agreement.

Brown - who recently met Adair in Manchester for a documentary - added that he will always be grateful to White for warning him of a plot by Adair to attack his home and family.

"In July 2000 he (White) did come forward to tell me about Adair's plan to attack my home and family."

He added: "He was very close to Adair, who wanted to take them back to war and could not accept peace, so to have someone so close to Adair and monitor his thinking would have been a feather in anyone's bonnet, never mind Special Branch's."


John white's dark deed

By Linda McKee

Senator Paddy Wilson (right) had been out for a drink with friends in the Old Vic Lounge of McGlade's public house on the evening of June 24, 1973.

Among the company was Irene Andrews, a Protestant from the Crumlin Road who was a former Belfast Telegraph employee.

The 29-year-old was regarded as one of the top ballroom dancers in Ulster and was a former member of the Northern Ireland 'Come Dancing' team.

When Mr Wilson gave Miss Andrews a lift home, it was the last time either of them was seen alive.

Early the next morning, their bodies were found lying on the Hightown Road near Glengormley, following a phone call to a Belfast paper by a man purporting to be Captain Black of the Ulster Freedom Fighters.

Senator Wilson had been stabbed 32 times and his throat cut. Miss Andrews had been stabbed 19 times. The pathologist's report said the wounds indicated both had died in a deliberate and frenzied attack.

More than five years later, John White pleaded guilty to the double murder and was jailed for life. Recommending that White should serve at least 20 years, the judge described it as the most horrific murder he had ever seen.

"That incident to me was a frenzied attack, a psychotic outburst. It was far removed from any shooting," he said.

After his release in the 1990s, White became a prominent member of the UDA-linked Ulster Democratic Party. As part of the UDP's negotiating team at Stormont, he was one of four loyalists who met the then Prime Minister John Major in Downing Street on July 22, 1996.

Comments: Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?